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Sportster Models 883, 883 Custom, 1200 Custom, 883L, 1200L, 1200S, 1200 Roadster, XR1200, and the Nightster.
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Old 08-16-2012, 12:39 AM
vinoo@go vinoo@go is offline
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Default superlow 2012

Hi , am a newbie rider , harley is new into india about 2000 bikes across india now .
The first question on any superlow rider in india is about the low GC & impact thereof owing to poor road conditions in many parts of India .

Can the roadster 883 ( not sure whether this model is there internationally )with GC of 140 mm shocks be swapped on to superlow without affecting the vehicle structurally . or for that matter iron 883 shocks : the question is there a practical increase in GC

Progressives 13 inch would increase GC by how much in real terms .
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Old 08-16-2012, 01:02 AM
Dash21182 Dash21182 is offline
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It will bring it up a Coupke Inches I would run the 13.5 Inch ShocksClick the image to open in full size.
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Old 08-16-2012, 05:55 AM
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grbrown grbrown is offline
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Hi from the UK and welcome to HDF.

I have a 2011 SuperLow and have raised the suspension at both ends. You will not harm the bike in any way. I fitted 13" Hagon shocks at the rear and RaceTech springs at the front.

Replacing the rear shocks is easy, but the forks have to be removed. Unfortunately the original springs in mine were very soft and when I sat on the bike I only had just over 1" travel left. That is bad on our English roads, must be awful on worst roads!

You can add spacers inside the forks, to raise the ride height and improve travel. It is not essential to fit new springs and worth trying.
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Old 08-16-2012, 07:46 AM
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edgeofinsanity edgeofinsanity is offline
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You may have to adjust your belt tension, or at least check it when changing to a different length rear shock. You could also use lowering blocks with longer shocks, you would keep the seat height (and handling) closer to stock, but would have the extra travel of the longer shock. Just make sure you don't have so much travel that your tire hits something inside the fender.
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Old 08-16-2012, 10:52 AM
vinoo@go vinoo@go is offline
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thanks to all of you for suggestions & pics
as harley is new here ,even options like hagon , progressive are difficult to source . is it mandatory that both rear and front are changed together , i mean what would the implication be if i just changed the shocks to 13 inchs at rear& left front as is . would it affect the bikes handling ?
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Old 08-16-2012, 01:12 PM
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grbrown grbrown is offline
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It is not mandatory to change both ends together. However if you install new shocks, they will lift the rear end a little and transfer more weight onto the forks. If you lift your bike up so the forks are fully extended, then compare them with when it is back on the ground, with you sitting on it, you will find you have very little travel left.

So it is probably better to do your forks first, so you have more travel to deal with any poor roads. You can improve them by simply adding spacers on top of the springs, to reduce sag.

As I said earlier, it is easy to change rear shocks. Hagon is a British firm and you can probably order direct from them. They can also supply fork springs.

Take care with using the word 'progressive'. There is a US company named Progressive Suspension Inc, who are a HDF sponsor and they also may be able to supply both shocks and springs. Some springs for both front and rear suspension are described as 'progressive-rate', often abbreviated to 'progressive' and here on HDF the suspension company is often called that too!

If you do want to buy, contact your chosen firm by email first. Also make a point of ordering them with springs to match your weight. In addition to the purchase price there are likely to be quite high shipping costs, plus any import taxes your Government charges.

Take some time to read through suspension threads here on HDF, so you get familiar with what can be done. Obviously you won't be interested in lowering your bike!
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Old 08-17-2012, 12:30 AM
vinoo@go vinoo@go is offline
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thanks graham for the inputs , really helps as most harley knowledge out here is quite sketchy at best . lowering the superlow ha ha that would mean an awesome display of sparks all the time
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Old 08-17-2012, 12:30 AM
 
 
 
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