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Researching my first bike!

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Old 06-11-2018, 03:00 PM
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Default Researching my first bike!

Hello everyone. I’m 45 and starting the process of researching my first bike purchase. The only thing I know so far is that I want a Harley Davidson. I love the look, the sound and I won’t lie, they have the best gear around. So what things do I need to consider? New? Used? I’d like to take a more extended trip someday, but maybe I shouldn’t get a small touring bike right away? Any and all advice, questions would be appreciative.
 
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Old 06-11-2018, 04:17 PM
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Welcome and go to your local HD dealer and check out the bikes that catch your eye. Then go from there. Also what type of riding do you see yourself doing, solo or with your wife? A lot of variables go into choosing a bike. Good luck.
 
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Old 06-11-2018, 04:45 PM
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Get a SMALL BIKE!
Why?
I suggest you spend a whole lot of time researching how to stay alive on a bike and less time about the brand.
Go with a small bike like a 250 CC and learn how to gear up,gear and dwn, slide through the turns.
Do it until you are as familiar with the outcome as a bird in flight flies.
Too many jump on a bike and end up as road kill.
You can be right, dead right is still as deadly.
The cars drivers are what will kill you, next the other is not learning the basics .
On a little bike its EZ, and the big one is way too much to start honing.
There was a person on here the other day and he did not know what counter steer, is.
He is not the last.
I talked to two instructors several years ago-they had never heard of it and thought I was stupid.
Besides -there are way too many of you old farts putting up the road all white knuckled at 45 MPH, trying to look kool.
Think about what i said.
 

Last edited by Kingglide549; 06-11-2018 at 04:47 PM.
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Old 06-11-2018, 04:47 PM
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Originally Posted by the wild hog View Post
Welcome and go to your local HD dealer and check out the bikes that catch your eye. Then go from there. Also what type of riding do you see yourself doing, solo or with your wife? A lot of variables go into choosing a bike. Good luck.
Unfortunately I will be riding solo for the foreseeable future as she doesn’t want to. Hopefully some day!
Originally Posted by the wild hog View Post
Welcome and go to your local HD dealer and check out the bikes that catch your eye. Then go from there. Also what type of riding do you see yourself doing, solo or with your wife? A lot of variables go into choosing a bike. Good luck.
Originally Posted by Kingglide549 View Post
Get a SMALL BIKE!
Why?
I suggest you spend a whole lot of time researching how to stay alive on a bike and less time about the brand.
Go with a small bike like a 250 CC and learn how to gear up,gear and dwn, slide through the turns.
Do it until you are as familiar with the outcome as a bird in flight flies.
Too many jump on a bike and end up as road kill.
You can be right, dead right is still as deadly.
The cars drivers are what will kill you, next the other is not learning the basics .
On a little bike its EZ, and the big one is way too much to start honing.
There was a person on here the other day and he did not know what counter steer, is.
He is not the last.
I talked to two instructors several years ago-they had never heard of it and thought I was stupid.
Besides -there are way too many of you old farts putting up the road all white knuckled at 45 MPH, trying to look kool.
Think about what i said.
I will take what you say under consideration. I have lots of friends who are seasoned veterans who are willing to take me under their wings and make sure I’m not, as you say, an “old fart trying to look cool.”
 

Last edited by ChickinOnaChain; 06-11-2018 at 06:09 PM.
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Old 06-11-2018, 05:01 PM
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If they cant explain- counter steer,
How to pass a car (most have no clue) !
If they can not do a front brake lock up .
(ask them to do one as it should be a steady part of your training like a pilot shoots touch and goes dead stick)

If they have no info about going through intersections....go get a real instructor, as you will be the proverb "the blind leading the blind.
You need a profound crash course of brain downloads!
Most anyone can keep a bike up on two wheels.
..............................untill the crap hits the fan.
 

Last edited by Kingglide549; 06-11-2018 at 05:03 PM.
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Old 06-11-2018, 05:15 PM
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If it's your first bike, I wouldn't start too big. Something a little bit lighter and easier to handle, until you become more comfortable. And I'd buy used, considering you'll probably be trading it after a short time. And unfortunately, it may get a scratch or dent along the way.
Whatever you choose, take your time learning to ride. And know that drivers aren't watching for you, you need to watch for them.
Be careful, but enjoy the bike.
 
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Old 06-11-2018, 05:23 PM
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Welcome...my recommendation is to "always" start on a learning bike (e.g. small street, or dirt). Take a MSF Beginner course and get some miles under your belt before hopping on the dream machine.

Trust me, dumped my 1st street bike in 1975 while taking turn on gravel (too hot into corner). I was used to dirt bikes and didn't allow for slick/street bike tires and it slid under me. Pretty bummer ride home w/all the visible damage. You don't want to be "that guy."
 
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Old 06-11-2018, 05:26 PM
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The really good riders started B4 8 or 9 yrs old, some b4 age 5
They learned the basics and so much more until it was all reflex.
They honed there skills until a 6th since evolved.
You know you are talking to a Gumbyy rider when he syas i layed it dwn!
In other words, another dweeb that had no Fn clue, locked up the rear brake, and gave up all control to fate!
Not too brilliant.
Now, Its not that you cant learn,, but its huge hurdle.
You need to pick brains, ask the whys, and stay to hail away
from novices that have been riding 40 years on sheer luck and know nothing.
Trailering one's bike to Sturgis once a year and riding around twn hardly accounts for experience.
 
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Old 06-11-2018, 06:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Iceman24 View Post
Welcome...my recommendation is to "always" start on a learning bike (e.g. small street, or dirt). Take a MSF Beginner course and get some miles under your belt before hopping on the dream machine.

Trust me, dumped my 1st street bike in 1975 while taking turn on gravel (too hot into corner). I was used to dirt bikes and didn't allow for slick/street bike tires and it slid under me. Pretty bummer ride home w/all the visible damage. You don't want to be "that guy."
Thanks Iceman. I remember watching my dad get dumped by a guy in a car that cut him off. I was a kid and thankfully it was a slow dump! I feel like my attitude going into this is good. And I want to be as safe a rider as I can be. There is a safety course at a local college that I’m going to be looking into.
Originally Posted by Mikerunsjax View Post
If it's your first bike, I wouldn't start too big. Something a little bit lighter and easier to handle, until you become more comfortable. And I'd buy used, considering you'll probably be trading it after a short time. And unfortunately, it may get a scratch or dent along the way.
Whatever you choose, take your time learning to ride. And know that drivers aren't watching for you, you need to watch for them.
Be careful, but enjoy the bike.
Thanks Mike. I wondered how soon I would want to “upgrade” once I got the itch. Also, how old can I get and at what mileage to not have to do a ton of repairs? I do plan on learning to do some of the basic repairs myself.
 

Last edited by ChickinOnaChain; 06-11-2018 at 09:39 PM.
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Old 06-11-2018, 06:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Quimbus2000 View Post


Thanks Mike. I wondered how soon I would want to “upgrade” once I got the itch. Also, how old can I get and at what mileage to not have to do a ton of repairs? I do plan on learning to do some of the basic repairs myself.
May I interrupt?
You will get a million ideas.
Pick something you like, comfortable with and ride it.
'Ride through any storm that comes along mechanically, it will be a better bike.
No use in selling after it is fixed!
which seems to be the most stupid mistake many make.
Learn its nuances.
They all come with a pedigree of birth defects.
Some worse then others.
 
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