Hurakàn: An Italian Cafe Racer

Daily Slideshow: FMW Motorcycles in Italy created this beauty, and appropriately named it after a Mayan god.

By Robert Bacon - October 1, 2018
Hurakan: An Italian Cafe Racer
Hurakan: An Italian Cafe Racer
Hurakan: An Italian Cafe Racer
Hurakan: An Italian Cafe Racer
Hurakan: An Italian Cafe Racer

The Hurakàn

When it comes to naming motorcycles, the Italians have a special talent. Even if you don't speak Italian, names like 'Brutale', 'Pantah', and 'Diavel', transcend language and can evoke emotion from anyone. The Italian custom motorcycle design company, FMW Motorcycles, is just as good as the industry leaders when it comes to naming their bikes, calling this beauty the 'Hurakàn'. FMW's owner, Lorenzo Fugaroli, said 'Hurakàn' comes from the Mayan deity of fire, storms, and wind. But Fugaroli didn't just want this bike to have a cool name, he wanted this bike to embody Hurakàn. Although a 1968 Harley-Davidson shovel frame was the starting point for the Hurakàn, it has been drastically altered to make the final product.

The Right Balance

The Hurakàn may look a little insane, but that's not how it should ride. You see, the Hurakàn is a 'special' shop build and, according to FMW's philosophy, special shop builds have to be easy to ride and comfortable while also being regarded as works of art - not an easy task. This mixture of art and comfort was made to celebrate Harley-Davidson's acquisition of MV Agusta. According to Fugaroli, "The combination of Harley Davidson and MV Agusta components was specifically chosen to celebrate the past acquisition of the Italian brand by the giant of Milwaukee, which spurred thousands of enthusiasts to dream of building unique bikes, maybe a little like this".

>>Join the conversation about Hurakàn the Italian Cafe Racer right here in the Harley-Davidson Forum!

Engine Upgrades

Harley-Davidson isn't known for its out and out-and-out performance, certainly not the way MV Agusta is. So FMW Motorcycles left no doubt in anyone's mind as to what the Hurakàn was about when they put an S&S 1,600cc V-twin in it and laid the power down through a BDL belt and chain. The gearbox was taken from a 1990's Softail and a hydraulic actuator has been added. Fueling is handled by a Mikuni carburetor with a flat 48mm valve and a brass machined velocity stack. So yes, the Hurakàn can certainly move.

>>Join the conversation about Hurakàn the Italian Cafe Racer right here in the Harley-Davidson Forum!

It Handles

It wasn't good enough for the Hurakàn to simply be fast in a straight line, it needed to turn and stop just as well. Showa forks, from an MV F4, were mounted on the front using triples which were hand machined from a steel billet. Bitubo, an Italian company, custom made the monoshock fitted at the rear. When it comes to stopping power, two, six-piston, Nissin calipers take care of business at the front, while a Performance Machine caliper is used at the rear. Custom floating inox steel discs are used on both ends.

>>Join the conversation about Hurakàn the Italian Cafe Racer right here in the Harley-Davidson Forum!

Finishing Touches

Yes, the Hurakàn goes, turns, and stops just as well as you'd imagine, but that's not what makes it stand out from the crowd. FMW Motorcycles didn't cut any corners when designing the Hurakàn, just look at that Kimura style exhaust system. Or the bodywork, which was all handmade from 3mm thick aluminum, and not just for aesthetic purposes, but so it could handle the S&S V-twin's vibrations. Even amongst the sea of brass and aluminum on the Hurakàn, the Motogadget Motoscope Pro, which relays information to the rider, still stays in line with the bike's retro feel. The biggest problem with the Hurakàn is FMW Motorcycle only made one. 

>>Join the conversation about Hurakàn the Italian Cafe Racer right here in the Harley-Davidson Forum!

For help with service on your bike, check out the how to section of HDForums.com.

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